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Michigan SR-22 Guidelines

A Hardship Driver’s License in the State of Michigan also referred to as An Ignition Interlock Driver License (IIL) allows you to drive a vehicle while your license is suspended or revoked for a drug or alcohol-related offense. While your driver’s license is suspended or revoked, you may be eligible to receive an Occupational/Restricted Driver License (ORL). This will allow you to drive to and from work, including self-employment, WorkFirst, apprenticeship, or on-the-job training. You may drive to school if you’re enrolled in an educational institution and pursuing a diploma, degree, or other certification. If you have court-ordered community service. Going to substance abuse treatment or a 12-step meeting if no transit service is available to you. Continuing your own healthcare, driving to a healthcare provider. Providing continuing care of someone who is dependent on you. Applying for an apprenticeship or on-the-job training. This type of ORL gives you 14 days to apply for these employment programs.

We recommend speaking with an attorney about the length of time you will need to carry an SR-22 insurance policy. The typical term is maintaining a policy for 3 years. It could possibly call for the policy to last up to 6 years or more. It is mandatory to maintain the high-risk insurance coverage during the time frame that the court mandates. If the policy lapses or cancels for any reason your license will be suspended again, and typically will have to start the process all over again. The State of Michigan may also require you to install an ignition interlock device in your vehicle and complete a DUI program. Below we have included information from the State of Michigan to assist you with this process.

Michigan Reinstating Your Driver’s License
Driver’s License Reinstatement
Form Application For BAIID Installer Certification
Request For Driver Evaluation
Request for Ignition Interlock Hearing
Drivers License Hearing Request Info

The State of Michigan law mandates that every automobile insurance policy sold in the state must have these minimum coverages. The insurance policy must have limits of at least:

Mandatory No-Fault Automobile Insurance Coverages
No-fault automobile insurance is required by Michigan law. Every car owner must buy certain
basic coverages in order to register a motor vehicle in Michigan. It is against the law to drive or let your car be driven, without no-fault insurance.

The mandatory no-fault policy has three parts:

  1. Personal Injury Protection (PIP)
    If you are hurt in an automobile accident, this part of your no-fault policy will pay all
    reasonably necessary medical expenses with no maximum limit. It will also pay, up to a
    maximum amount, for the wages you would have earned if you had not been hurt, for up to
    three years. Visit www.michigan.gov/DIFS for current wage loss amounts.
    If you are killed in an accident, your policy will pay your spouse and dependents up to the
    monthly amount for three years, based on what they would have received from your earnings
    and fringe benefits. You may also be entitled up to $20 per day in replacement services. This is to pay for services you are no longer able to provide for yourself or your family because you are injured, such as
    housekeeping and yard work. You may coordinate PIP coverage with your health or disability policy (except Medicaid, Medicare, or a Medicare Supplemental policy) to reduce your PIP premium. The health or disability plan then becomes the primary payer for medical or wage loss expenses, and the automobile policy would cover remaining medical or wage loss expenses. Not all health plans will pay for medical expenses resulting from an automobile accident. Check with your health insurer to verify if they will cover injuries as a primary provider for automobile accidents.
  2. Property Protection Insurance (PPI)
    Your policy will pay up to $1 million for damage your car does in Michigan to other people’s
    property, such as buildings and fences. This coverage will also pay for damage your car does
    to other people’s properly parked vehicles.
  3. Residual Liability Insurance — Bodily Injury and Property Damage (BI/PD)
    The no-fault law protects insured persons from being sued as the result of an automobile
    accident, except in certain special situations. These are some of the circumstances under
    which you could be sued:
    • If you cause an accident in Michigan in which someone is killed or seriously injured.
    • If you are involved in an accident in Michigan with a non-resident who is an occupant of a motor vehicle not registered in Michigan.
    • If you are involved in an accident in a state other than Michigan.
    • The residual liability portion of your no-fault policy will pay up to your coverage limit amounts if you are found legally responsible for damages in these situations.

    The minimum required BI/PD coverage limits are:

    • Up to $20,000 for a person who is hurt or killed in an accident.
    • Up to $40,000 for each accident if several people are hurt or killed.
    • Up to $10,000 for property damage in another state.

    These limits are often described as 20/40/10. Courts sometimes award more than these amounts.
    If this happens, you would be responsible for paying the amount not covered by your
    policy. To protect themselves, many people buy extra liability insurance.

We recommend you fill out our contact form. Once completed, an SR-22 insurance specialist will call or email you within 24 hours.

For additional information please contact https://www.michigan.gov/

Affordable SR-22 Insurance For The Entire State of Michigan, including:
Detroit, Grand Rapids City, Warren City, Sterling Heights, Ann Arbor City, Lansing City, Dearborn, Clinton Charter Township, Canton, Livonia, Macomb, Troy City, Westland, Farmington Hills, Flint City, Shelby, Southfield City, Wyoming, Rochester Hills, Kalamazoo City, Waterford, Novi City, West Bloomfield, Taylor, Dearborn Heights, Pontiac, St. Clair Shores, Royal Oak City, Ypsilanti, Kentwood.